• 1 November 2022

    IAMs and CSOs Discuss the Next Generation of Accountability Mechanism Reforms

    By Accountability Counsel
    Accountability Counsel led the International Advocates’ Working Group in coordinating CSO Day at the 19th annual meeting of the Independent Accountability Mechanism Network. Participants gathered in New York and virtually to discuss the continued evolution of accountability mechanisms in key areas, including monitoring, addressing reprisals, and facilitating remedy for project-affected communities.
  • 6 October 2022

    Accountability Counsel Files Brief Demanding Open Public Meetings at DFC

    By Accountability Counsel
    Accountability Counsel, supported by EarthRights International, filed an amicus brief to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to support transparency and stakeholder engagement at the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation (DFC). The brief argues against the DFC’s decision to exempt itself from the Government in the Sunshine Act, which requires federal agencies to open their meetings to the public. We highlighted the importance of transparency and stakeholder engagement in decision-making for project-affected communities and their advocates.  
  • 19 September 2022

    Nepal: UN Experts sound the alarm on violations of indigenous peoples’ rights and call for respect of the right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) in the development of Marsyangdi Corridor Transmission Line Project

    By FPIC & Rights Forum, LAHURNIP, and Accountability Counsel
    FPIC & Rights Forum, LAHURNIP, and Accountability Counsel released a statement to welcome the letters from the UN human rights experts who expressed serious concerns about ongoing human rights violations and retaliations against indigenous communities and members of FPIC and Rights Forum in Lamjung District, Nepal.
  • 16 September 2022

    Recommendations to Improve The World Bank’s Accountability Process From 57 Civil Society Organizations

    By Multiple Authors
    Accountability Counsel, along with 56 other organizations, submitted recommendations for making the World Bank’s accountability process more effective for communities harmed by World Bank projects.
  • 12 September 2022

    New Report, Our Last and Only Resort, Examines What Happens When Development Goes Wrong in the Middle East and North Africa

    By Marisa Lenci, Accountability Counsel
    Drawing on over 20 years of complaint and project data across the region, and first-hand accounts from nearly a dozen communities across five countries, our new report, co-authored by Accountability Counsel and the Arab Watch Coalition, finds that communities in the MENA face disproportionately severe limitations on access to accountability and remedy from harm.
  • 7 September 2022

    What happens when development goes wrong in the MENA? Part 1

    By Marisa Lenci, Accountability Counsel
    The MENA region has the fewest complaints to IAMs, and extremely low rates of those complaints reaching outputs from the process. Our upcoming report, Our Last and Only Resort, set to launch next week, details important findings about why complaints in the MENA region fall short relative to other regions. The report draws on research from 20 years of complaint and project data, and nearly a dozen interviews with groups in the MENA about their experiences in IAM complaint processes. This article provides a look at the complaint and project data that first waved a red flag about the implications of uneven IAM complaints for communities experiencing harm from projects in the MENA.
  • 1 August 2022

    What Accountability Mechanisms Tell Us About Greenwashing

    By Iris Vukovic, Accountability Counsel
    Many projects claim to help the environment, but what kinds of harmful impacts are hidden beneath the guise of eco-friendly objectives?
  • 5 July 2022

    Infrastructure Complaints in South and Southeast Asia

    By Samer Aarabi, Accountability Counsel
    167 complaints have been filed about infrastructure projects in South and Southeast Asia. What can they tell us about types of community harm, the role of private and bilateral investment, and the increasing presence of Chinese finance in the region and around the world?
  • 17 June 2022

    Understanding Community Harm Part 6: Cultural Heritage

    By Anthony Williams, Accountability Counsel
    Individuals, communities, and NGOs file complaints to international finance institutions (IFIs) for harm caused by IFI-funded development projects. In compiling these complaints into the Accountability Console database, our research team tries to ascertain and categorize the issues or concerns raised for each complaint. Of all these complaints, six percent detail…
  • 8 June 2022

    Accountability Counsel Commends Draft FinDev Canada Accountability Framework and Calls for Additional Accessibility Measures

    By Accountability Counsel
    FinDev Canada, Canada’s development finance institution, recently held consultations on draft procedures for its new independent accountability mechanism. Accountability Counsel provided comments on the document, and commends FinDev Canada for developing a robust accountability framework.
  • 7 June 2022

    AC Calls for New U.S. National Action Plan on Responsible Business Conduct to Champion Accountability and Remedy

    By Stephanie Amoako and Mireille Becerra, Accountability Counsel
    Accountability Counsel and Inclusive Development International recently submitted recommendations to ensure that accountability and remedy are key components of the revised U.S. National Action Plan on Responsible Business Conduct.
  • 27 May 2022

    “Stop funding projects exacerbating climate change and human rights violations”

    By #AfDBAM2022 - Accra CSO Statement
    Civil society organizations are calling on the African Development Bank (AfDB) to stop funding projects that exacerbate the climate crisis, damage the environment, and cause human rights violations. This call is being particularly amplified this week as the AfDB is holding its Annual Meetings in Accra, Ghana But communities most affected by the impacts of climate change, and civil society groups supporting them, will not have a seat at the table. Once again, crucial decisions on multi-million-dollar projects affecting their lives will be made without them.
  • 27 May 2022

    « Non au financement des projets aggravant le changement climatique et les violations des droits humains » 

    By #AfDBAM2022 - Accra CSO Statement
    Les organisations de la société civile exhortent la Banque Africaine de Développement (BAD) à mettre fin au financement des projets qui exacerbent le changement climatique, nuisent à l’environnement et causent des violations des droits humains. Cette doléance est réitérée cette semaine lors des Assemblées Annuelles organisées par la banque à Accra, au Ghana.
  • 16 May 2022

    The European Investment Bank must walk the talk and uphold its zero-tolerance policy on reprisals against communities in Lamjung District, Nepal

    By FPIC & Rights Forum, LAHURNIP, and Accountability Counsel
    Members of FPIC and Rights Forum, a network of Indigenous and local communities who have been affected by the development of a transmission line project in Lamjung District, Nepal, demand that the European Investment Bank stop turning a blind eye to human rights violations associated with the project and follow through with its commitments on protection and sustainable development.
  • 2 May 2022

    Understanding Community Harm Part 5: Livelihoods

    By Lama Almoayed, Accountability Counsel
    Nearly one out of five of all complaints filed to accountability offices raise issues related to livelihoods. We use two separate coal power plants based in Gujarat, India and Bargny, Senegal as case studies of how communities fight for the restoration of their livelihoods.
  • 26 April 2022

    Nothing Has Changed About the IFC’s Responsibility to Remedy Harm from Its Projects

    By Accountability Counsel
    Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal from Indian fishing communities who sued the International Finance Corporation over environmental and livelihood damage caused by an IFC-financed coal power plant. While the Supreme Court’s decision means that the communities’ legal case in the United States may be over, it does not mean that the IFC can walk away from its responsibility to ensure that harms to this community – and other communities impacted by IFC financing – are effectively remediated.
  • 4 April 2022

    IAM Complaint Stages: Dispute Resolution

    By Marisa Lenci, Accountability Counsel
    Dispute resolution processes can be an opportunity for communities to reach creative solutions to the harm they are facing from development projects. But how often do they result in agreements, and how often do these agreements result in real remedy?
  • 23 March 2022

    Tanzania: Expedite Protections for Girls’ Education

    Tanzania’s pledge to adopt guidelines to ensure that schools ensure adolescent mothers can return to schools by June 2022 is an important turning point for girls’ education, Human Rights Watch and Accountability Counsel said today. On March 8, the Tanzanian government and the World Bank had published their agreement to restructure Tanzania’s Secondary Education Quality Improvement Program (SEQUIP), financed by a US$500 million loan from the World Bank, to adopt new measures to effectively end a school ban against students who are pregnant or are mothers.
  • 22 March 2022

    Congress Pushes for Stronger Accountability for U.S. Government Development Activities: FY 22 Appropriations Round-up

    By Stephanie Amoako, Accountability Counsel
    This month, Congress passed its fiscal year 2022 legislation to fund the government, and in passing this legislation included a call to strengthen accountability for the U.S. government’s development activities abroad. We are pleased to see several of the recommendations that we submitted during the appropriations process incorporated in the explanatory statement and House report accompanying the legislation.
  • 7 March 2022

    Why Do Complaints Take So Long?

    By Samer Araabi, Accountability Counsel
    It takes an average of two years for a complaint to produce outputs. What takes so much time, and how long is too long?